Skin Needling

What is melasma and what does it look like?

Melasma is a common skin disorder. Loosely translated, the word means “black spot.” If you have melasma you’re probably experiencing light brown, dark brown and/or blue-gray patches on your skin. They can appear as flat patches or freckle-like spots. Commonly affected areas include your face, including the cheeks, upper lip and forehead, as well as the forearms. Melasma is sometimes called the “mask of pregnancy” because it frequently affects pregnant women. Melasma typically darkens and lightens over time, often getting worse in the summer and better in the winter.

Another, less common name for melasma, is chloasma. Although this disorder is completely harmless, it understandably makes some people feel self-conscious.

What are the types of melasma?

There are three types of melasma and they have to do with the depth of the pigment. A Wood’s lamp that emits black light may be used to determine the depth of the pigment. The three types are:

Epidermal: Epidermal melasma has a dark brown color, a well-defined border, appears obvious under black light and sometimes responds well to treatment.
Dermal: Dermal melasma has a light brown or bluish color, a blurry border, appears no differently under black light and doesn’t respond well to treatment.
Mixed melasma: Mixed melasma, which is the most common of the three, has both bluish and brown patches, shows a mixed pattern under black light and shows some response to treatment.

                                                                                                

What causes melasma?

There are two main causes of melasma: radiation, whether ultraviolet, visible light, or infrared (heat) light; and hormones. Ultraviolet and infrared radiation from the sun are key in making melasma worse. Other possible causes of melasma include:

  • Antiseizure medications: Drugs that prevent you from having seizures may be a cause of melasma. An example of an antiseizure medication is Clobazam (Onfi®).
  • Contraceptive therapy (birth control): Melasma has been observed in individuals who use oral contraceptive pills that contain estrogen and progesterone.
  • Estrogen/Diethylstilbestrol: Diethylstilbestrol is a synthetic (man-made) form of the hormone estrogen. It’s often used in treatments for prostate cancer. Again, there’s a pattern between increased estrogen and melasma.
  • Genetics: About 33% to 50% of people with melasma have reported that someone else in the family has it. The majority of identical twins both have melasma.
  • Hypothyroidism A condition where your thyroid is underactive.
  • LED Screens: Melasma may be caused by the LED lights from your television, laptop, cell phone and tablet.
  • Pregnancy: It is unclear why “the mask of pregnancy” happens to pregnant women. However, experts theorize that the increased levels of estrogen, progesterone and the melanocyte-stimulating hormones during the third trimester of pregnancy play a role.
  • Hormones: Hormones like estrogen and progesterone may play a role in some people. Postmenopausal women are sometimes given progesterone, and have been observed developing melasma. If you aren’t pregnant, you likely have elevated levels of estrogen receptors found in your melasma lesions.
  • Makeup (cosmetics): Some cosmetics can cause what’s called a phototoxic reaction.
  • Phototoxic drugs (medicines that make you sensitive to sunlight): These include some antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), diuretics, retinoids, hypoglycaemics, antipsychotics, targeted therapies and some other drugs.
  • Skin care products: A product that irritates your skin in general will likely make your melasma worse.
  • Soaps: Some scented soaps are thought to cause or worse melasma.
  • Tanning beds: The UV light produced by tanning beds damages your skin just as bad as the UV light from the sun, and sometimes worse.

No preparation needed for Microdermabrasion.

We do recommend to avoid sun exposure and no waxing,

plucking or shaving 2 weeks prior to your treatment.

Microdermabrasion treatments are extremely safe and effective.

Any redness, temporary flaking and mild discolouration

will disappear after your treatment.

 

No preparation needed for Microdermabrasion.

We do recommend to avoid sun exposure and no waxing,

plucking or shaving 2 weeks prior to your treatment.

Microdermabrasion treatments are extremely safe and effective.

Any redness, temporary flaking and mild discolouration

will disappear after your treatment.

 

No preparation needed for Microdermabrasion.

We do recommend to avoid sun exposure and no waxing,

plucking or shaving 2 weeks prior to your treatment.

Microdermabrasion treatments are extremely safe and effective.

Any redness, temporary flaking and mild discolouration

will disappear after your treatment.

 

Results - Before & After